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Eskom...

I've been a defender of the Eskom view of the current energy crisis in Cape Town and SA, and I still advocate that one should take a holistic view of the development, handing over and pre-1994 issues relating to a new democracy, keeping everyone happy, figuring out how to run a country, build 3.2 million houses, facilitate 6% economic growth, try and stamp out crime and manage not to have civil war and retribution after 300 years of oppression (latter being quite amazingly well accomplished) and still acquire skills and leadership to keep a satisfactory level of BEE status to keep the new democracy real (and not simply perceived in the eyes of the previously disadvantaged), explain to a cabinet (that didn't listen a couple of years ago to the plea for funding, manage to become semi-privatised, show profit for the shareholders and manage to keep the power=supply adequite when uninformed greenies (I'm green too, but try and manage perspective) makes it near impossible to build another Koeberg. (Like coal is eco-friendly). I still advocate that, even though as I'm typing this the power was cut and I relied on my UPS to keep my going. It went on 2 minutes ago again.

I do have to concede this: It is annoying to work without electricity! As a photographer whose technology heavy industry relies on electricity, I feel the pinch.
My thought is this: In Cape Town we are bombarded with eco-energy on daily basis like the 27 deg C sunshine, and the 40km/h south easter. Surely small guys like myself can start to manage supplying power ourselves? Any ideas? It's been floating in my mind a lot, since all my equipment is low amp/voltage machinery, surely a decent sized solar panel and wind charger could be a temporary solution? Which brings me to water and a 500l watertank for each office... But more about that another time.

I think Eskom is a wake-up to us and the rest of the world that how we source energy is not sustainable, and we can go a long way to using friendly, free energy compliments of mother nature. Understandably, heavy industry cannot do this, but in terms of micro business and residential homes, we can get a heck of a lot closer to self-sustainability?

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