Skip to main content

Winemakers and their cars

Last year, for the October issue of Wine magazine I was commissioned to shoot winemakers and their cars. 6 winemakers were selected and I was sent to shoot each. This was exciting, as it left me with some creative license, some brief in terms of layout and then two of my most enjoyable subjects: winemakers and cars. Perfect marriage? Possibly.

Andrew Gunn - Iona Wines: this is his first car he ever owned. A Porche. I decided on tracking. Getting to his farm near Elgin is a bit of a bundu bash, so I'm not sure the car gets a lot of road time out there! I was also not keen on missing out on the beauty of the surrounds. Unfortunately Wine mag decided on a posed image of them at his house. This was my favorite, though. I left with a fabulous bottle of Sauvignon Blanc that was enjoyed some months later with Rudi's Jagermeister or Blue Cheese Boerewors. Magic.

20090728_0995 Andrew Gunnlr

Gyles Webb - Thelema: the Mini Cooper S just shone like a jewel the moment we put lights on it, so we ended up with this baby. Initially I tried on-car tracking, but the point was missed, so we opted for the more styled approach. The winery in the back with the mountains full of ominous clouds also worked in my composition. Afterwards he entertained us to some coffee, talk on gardening, eco-farming and his golf handicap. (If memory serves me correct, he used to play from a scratch handicap.) I left with a Sauvignon Blanc and Shiraz. Magic.

20090729_0923 Giles Webblr

Pierre Wahl - Rijks: for this shot I had to head out Tulbach way, with the ever present threat of rain following me there, but once there, Pierre and I quickly found a spot that showcases the farm and gave the image a proper English country estate feel. Oh, he drives a Z3 for fun. He bought it with his dad. Normally he travels by bakkie, like most winefarmers! I left with a Sauvignon blanc among other really killer wines.

20090731_0060 Pierre Wahllr

Ken Forrester - Ken Forrester: Mr. Chenin himself was caught slightly unawares, as the car we were supposed to photograph, his 1976 Jag, was in for a serious panel job, but no worries, a 1950's BMW motorcycle was handy. I much preferred this anyways. Although he was dreadfully busy, he gave us such a nice time, and afterwards sat us down for a tasting of some incredible French Sauvignon Blanc (R400 per bottle ex Cellar) and entertained us with knowledge on viniculture, the fallacy of green Sauvignon Blanc's, stressing vines and traveling.

20090729_0949 Ken Forrester and Bikelr

Pieter Ferreira - Graham Beck: I feel like Pieter is somehow embedded in my camera, so many times have I photographed him. Anyways, little did I know he owned a seriously old Citroen, he imported from France. One of those typical 1970's foreign film cars. Anyways, we met in Franschhoek and drove to Robertson for the sum-total of 30 minutes to do the shoot and then come back. Again, good fun. I don't recall leaving with Sauvignon Blanc.

20090817_0022 bubbles Ferreirralr 

Boela Gerber - Groot Constantia: Boela's little Morris Minor is a beauty, and would've been even more impressive had it been able to start and drive itself to the location. It had recently been flooded in the garage and left the engine with much damage. However, on a farm there is always a tractor handy and we were able to pull it to where it needed to be. Then there was the case of the baboons always lurking nearby being rather threatening. All in all, we had good fun and left with some really awesome Sauvignon Blanc, and a dessert wine.

20090730_0043 Boela Gerber Finallr

Art directors. Please. Send me more assignments like these!


Anonymous said…
Hi Danie,
Great action shot of the Porsche, I love the clouds and road effect.
I would like to acquire some of the photos you took, can you let me have details?
Andrew Gunn

Popular posts from this blog

Dangerous Photography Jobs is taken from the above article, with permission:Photography can be a case of life or death. It may sound absurd, but professional photographers often go to great lengths and compromise their safety in order to get the perfect picture. Whether it’s a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to photograph Mount Everest or a mission to cover the Iraq war, many photographers risk their lives just to do their job. Here are 10 dangerous photography jobs: Extreme Weather Photography
Extreme weather photographers aren’t storm chasers, but they do have an eye for photographing hurricanes, tornados, thunderstorms and other severe weather in their most vulnerable state. As you can imagine, this job is nothing short of extreme. Extreme weather photographers have to get close to the storm when everyone else is running from it, which puts them at risk for injuries and often death. BASE Jumping & Skydiving Photography

Bronx Shoes Billboard Shoot

If you're passing Gugulethu Taxi Rank's way, or JHB Taxi Rank, you will notice a 6x9m billboard with a Bronx ad on it. Above is the Gugs one  and the Jozi one.Now, if you've wondered what goes into shooting something like this, well here goes.Client: Bronx ShoesAgency: Traffic Integrated Marketing - Danie Nel Photography - and Design: Bianca at Traffic Integrated MarketingModel: Bobby Roache - Base Models - www.basemodelagency.comThe concept was of a guy sitting perched somewhere, so one can see a Afro-entric urban landscape in the background, dramatically lit. The product shots of shoes (I shot those later in studio) would then be dropped onto the image along with copy, logo's and catchline. Also, a JHB skyline, shot by another photographer, would be dropped into one of the shots for the JHB billboard.SO:First you quote and get approval and get that out of the way. Then you go for a recce mission to get a …

Wedding: A&D, Solms-Delta

It’s a real big kick for me if I get to shoot one of my commercial clients’ weddings, every time such an opportunity comes up. It has happened a number of times now, which I’m grateful for. Not only does it allow you into a very special and personal part of a client’s life, but also allows you to reward their loyalty and trust in you.

In this case, the client and I have been doing work together for 8 years, shooting PR and ad campaigns, and having a good relationship always. However, as much as I need to impress him, it is of no use if his bride-to-be does not approve. I’m very grateful that she did, and what an easy subject she turned out to be to boot!

Horses make up a big part of her life, so it was decided that she would enter the ceremony on a horse, so prior to the ceremony starting, I had a short while to familiarise myself with equestrian photography! As it was not her own horse either, she just needed a couple of minutes to whisper to it or whatever it is that horse-people d…