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Shooting Anton Fabi Shoes Compaign

We got the great opportunity to shoot another campaing for the good people at Jordan shoes, the people who we shot the Bronx Hunter campaign for, with agency, Traffic Integrated Marketing.

PIC-0496 This time around, we weren’t gonna be hanging from high-rise buildings, or really risking our lives, but rather, the concept was one of “Shoes that makes you famous”. The agency came up with the idea of putting cut-out card-board (life-size) paparazzi photographers and a cut-out muscle car in the shots and creating a pseudo red-carpet scene in a normal urban set-up. The location was chosen as The Bromwell Boutique Mall in Woodstock, who by the ways, makes a mean mushroom sandwich.

The weather was a bit wet, but we had some cover thanx to the nice people at the Bromwell, and at just the right times the weather lit up. Also, it made the background lighting nice and moody, giving us a bit of a New York feel. Most important accessory of the day – sandbags. The wind tends to blow little cut-out men over. Second – coffee.

Our model for the day was Valentine, who also happens to be a Muyi Thai instructor. That means he had the appropriate pain-barrier for wearing shoes a size too small. Well, it’s true. Some guys just ooze coolness, and that’s why they’re on that side of the camera and I’m on this side. Sebestine Pepler was on the make-up for us and Nicky and Anne handling the styling, art direction etc for Traffic.

As we’re prepping a video of the shoot, I’m not gonna divulge too much, except for some pics. 

For the more technically minded (yes, you Strobists), we used: Profoto 7B with 2 heads and about 6 or 7 off camera flashes, including a 580 EX II, a cheapie old old Vivitar thyristor, a Sunpack G4500, a Nissin 5500 (both hammerheads), a auto slave flash (guide number about 16), and Nikon SB-16, Elinchrom SkyPort triggers and some optical slaves.

 

Anton Fabi Laduma adFAlr 

This is the original brief shot – which I dig, by the way.

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After we had the shots in the bag we played some more and came up with this as well.

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The Team: Nicky, me, Cut Out Dude, Valentine, Cut Out dude, Sebastine, But Out Dude, Anne, Philip.

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Comments

Hey Danie,
Dis die eerste video interview wat ek nie soos 'n loser voel nie!! well done, die final images lyk great!!
lekker werk!
Danie Nel said…
Hehe, ek's bly. Maak soos ek en gaan aspris vir die loser-look (soos die close-up wide-angle) - dan voel mens altyd pleasantly surprised!
vans shoes said…
Interesting and valuable information on shoe campaign further I would say that contemporary footwear varies widely in style, complexity and cost. Basic sandals may consist of only a thin sole and simple strap.

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