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Annual Report – University of the Western Cape

For the last 2 years, we’ve  been contracted by UWC to shoot their recruitment, general research publication portraiture and also annual report and marketing imagery. To say that I know the campus well now, would be a gross understatement. On a particular day I remember walking the breadth of the campus probably a good 4 times. If you know the size of the campus, you’ll understand that we’re talking a lot of steps here. Also, we’ve had from 35 deg heat, to trudging in the rain and battling the howling South Easter, but it’s been fun. From technical, to architectural, to medical, to industrial, to portraiture, to landscapes, to photojournalism, to mug-shots, to interiors, decor, close-ups, concepts, books… it’s been a smorgasbord of photographic disciplines. And the students had to look happy, confident, learned, special, attractive, colourful, radiant… you catch my drift. We’ve recently completed images of the spectacular new New Sciences building, using HDR methods and simply just having good old fun. And serious amounts of elbow grease.

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The cool, but challenging thing is that through these many disciplines, you have to keep a constant thread of signature, or similarity, yet still make the documentary shots as evocative as Cartier-Bresson, the portraits Irving Penn-like, and the science shots like NCIS or CIS labs. By the way, anybody that’s ever been to an institutional science facility, would know that heaven knows where NCIS and CIS labs get their neon and luminous glow from. In real life it’s dreary, dull and smells. However, I loved taking the challenge of NCIS-ing it a bit. 20090820_011020090820_0022lr20090821_0215

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There was one week, where we were on the campus for 3 days, walking the width and breadth through a number of times, grabbing only the most basic of foodstuffs from the cafeteria. Total amount of weight lost by end of that week? 3kg. And we were seriously hoping the security guys would lend us one of their electric car contraptions. 

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We also got stuck in an elevator with our chaperones for 20 minutes, took pics of Philip snuffing some unknown powder in the pharmacy department, being excited about suppositories and Philip mourning the sickness of a doll in the nursing department. Oh, and he was the model in the dentistry department. We have to stay sane as well, you know.

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