Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from August, 2010

Dangerous Photography Jobs

http://www.onlinecertificateprograms.org/blog/2010/10-dangerous-photography-jobs/This is taken from the above article, with permission:Photography can be a case of life or death. It may sound absurd, but professional photographers often go to great lengths and compromise their safety in order to get the perfect picture. Whether it’s a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to photograph Mount Everest or a mission to cover the Iraq war, many photographers risk their lives just to do their job. Here are 10 dangerous photography jobs: Extreme Weather Photography
Extreme weather photographers aren’t storm chasers, but they do have an eye for photographing hurricanes, tornados, thunderstorms and other severe weather in their most vulnerable state. As you can imagine, this job is nothing short of extreme. Extreme weather photographers have to get close to the storm when everyone else is running from it, which puts them at risk for injuries and often death. BASE Jumping & Skydiving Photography
See…

Amazing Roger Federer trickshot on Gillette ad shoot

The only reason I'm probably justified to post this here is that it happens in a neat photo studio, and it is awesome tennis version of William Tell!Ok - to justify it being on the blog, let me quickly deconstruct what happened with the pics - my guess, looking at some of the images out there:2 softboxes on Profoto heads - probably 7A packs for 2.4 KW. Sandwich setting (2 softboxes directly on either side of Roger, in a linear layout, w.o.w. SOFTBOX ->ROGER <- SOFTBOX, brolly box as hair and brush/rim light over should and hair. . Symmetrical balance on keys.

There, I justified posting a totally unphotographic post.

Carling Black Label TV Ads.

I was commissioned to shoot the behind-the-scenes photos for the two last Carling Black Label TV Ads. The cool thing about shooting the bts images is that you see the scale at which companies operate. The drag race scene had about 150 extras alone on set, never-mind the 10 plus trucks full of gear and loads of crew. Seeing the assistant director controlling the lot to let the director get on with what he’s doing, was quite a show!It’s also great to see how from small snippets and shots, once woven together, a beautiful sequence is born. We were very curious to see the final product, after seeing only the actual filming. Very impressed. Coming onto the set for this, the second shoot, I had no idea who Ruud Gullit is or was. I picked up he was some sort of big deal in the soccer world, but it took me a bit of research on the wiki the next day to realise that he was actually quite a major deal in Euro-football. Not unlike the time I sat next to Stuart Edwards at a business trade show, the…

BMW 5 Series Launch

Shooting a car launch always promises to be fun. A car launch is a multi-disciplined affair, if you choose to approach it more than just an event. I arrive with a full compliment of lighting, stands and thingemebobs, to make sure I’m prepared for any eventuality. I look to supply the client with: images of the actual vehicle being launched in the milieu of the launch (automotive photos in this case), landscapes, interiors and details shots creating a sense of the environment, shots of the promo material and various elements of the event organising, social images, corporate PR type images for media, and even food if it makes part of the event. No wonder this type of things suits me like a glove. When you’re shooting a BMW 5 –series, it promises to be stylishly fun. READ: great locations, great food, intelligent conversation. However, if you need to photograph 5 of these monsters being driven by journo’s putting it through it’s paces on a 300km, non-circular route, and you need to catch…

The Coolest Project. Ever.

I’m exposed to media, creativity and cleverness on a daily basis. Not often does something come along that makes me stand up at my desk and applaud. You might look at it and not quite feel the same, but this project completed for Levi’s by a couple of okes in the States, really pushed all the right buttons for me. First the ‘result’. Then the ‘making of’. I was inclined to tell you how they did it, etc, but rather watch the video. Bravo.