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Wellness in the City #ActiveChallenge Video



So, Marisa from Wellness in the City contacted me last year and proposed a little project. (I know her as a PR Boss at Butterknife PR). One of her projects away from the PR business is a wellness blog/website she runs with her friend and co-fitness-fanatic, Nicole Upton. They've taken to doing different kinds of fitness regimes for a month or two, with some sort of final goal in mind. Training and finishing a triathlon, for instance.

So back to the proposal. This time around the ladies decided that boxing training was where it's at. Or possibly could be at. I was asked to come and join them (with my video gear) at one of their Virgin Active training sessions with coach Enver Pockpass, a mean boxer himself. The idea was to record the initial session, where they would be learning the ropes of the training, and then, to arrive again a month later to capture the completion of their goal: taking on Siv Ngesi, actor and amateur boxer, for a full-on, hour's worth of boxing training. Note, not sparring. Siv won't hit girls, and they would have no problem hitting him, so that would just not work.

I was impressed from the get-go. The ladies, already being fit going into this, had body awareness and co-ordination that made it easier for them to get the basic ideas behind boxing training. However, what they were not ready for, I think, was what it feels like to get hit during conditioning training. The coach would "condition" them by quickly hitting them with pads on the arms and shoulders. Now, guys are used to this, as we horse around as youngsters, and basically condition our bodies to taking beatings. Girls, not so much. Their expressions at being hit was quite funny, actually. Almost like "that is way uncomfortable". And me standing there, thinking "nah, really, you think?"

Also, the intensity of boxing training was also something new to them, I think. Hitting, bobbing and weaving, floating like butterflies and stinging like bees actually take a huge amount of energy. Core strength, leg strength, stamina and perseverance are part and parcel of boxing training.

So how did they fare? Well, I think pretty darn good. Siv is one intense training partner. With screams, trash-talking and more testosterone you can wave a stick at, it made for an interesting bout. Needles to say, the ladies had no problem keeping up with the fitness side of things. Siv just hit the pads and bags way harder! Well, you can see in the video, so no use talking about that too much!

Anyways, in terms of technical, video-geek stuff, there is not much to share. Basically 2 5D's, GoPro and sliders, etc.

To me, the best part was actually how inspiring this all was. In my younger years I was a very keen martial artists (Chinese Kung Fu), but have since become unfit, and actually a bit lazy. Fighting arts, and training, just conjures up such emotions of bad-assery, and speaks directly to that lizard-brain, hunter deep inside me. So: I've been looking around at some training facilities to get myself into shape again.

So ladies, job well done. 1 Person motivated to get fit and healthy again.







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